Bizarre, trancelike, surreal – only such a slurry of words can come close to capturing Anima. For just as the essence of dreams is lost through verbal description, here too we have a performance which ventures into the indescribable.

Even the journey there was strange. The audience met outside the Brighton Dome where we were ushered into a private bus by an animated French mademoiselle who was dressed like a circus showman. She spoke with a stereotypically broken accent – which she assured us was part of the act – and kept the whole crowd entertained with her eccentric charm.

We arrived at the venue – a little community hall close to Brighton station – where crazed women ran towards us with lampshades, and an offbeat band played absently from the rooftops. Soon after, we were guided into a darkened room, and the performance began.

Eerie music, jerky movements, languages we could not understand: Anima plunged us into its unintelligible depths. We watched as this bizarre cast of dreamers enacted their fantasies, using lamps to trail around the curtains, create images on the walls, and even to explore their own bodies. Light was certainly the central motif of the performance, and as something both natural and manmade it disclosed a symbolic significance. The drive seemed to be a return to carnality – groaned repeatedly through the microphone – and indeed to the anima, which, as the flyer informs us, is ‘the archetype of life itself’.

The experience was carnivalesque, hypnotic, and derealised: a non-sequential trip through the human psyche. The phrase ‘weird but wonderful’ springs to mind, as Anima was precisely that, so if you have a touch of the freakish about you, it comes highly recommended.”

By Joshua Feldman
The New Current 

Full article here

Photographs by Genia Mineeva:

Outdoor part of show, photographs by Lucy Muirhead:

Our one and only Marion! Bringing and warming up the audience who chose to arrive to the show on the Big Lemon Bus:

“A vibrant performer on the Big Lemon Bus, entertained us with cheeky banter and kicked off our journey into the collective unconscious at the Westhill!”

Latest 7

“As with last year’s popular A Ship of Fools, The Karavan Ensemble’s latest production begins in the centre of town with Marion Déprez conducting an impromptu conference with the oversubscribed audience before herding them onto the Big Lemon and keeping up her trademark barmy authority throughout the circuitous journey. Getting there is half the fun really.”

Total Theatre

“As with last year’s popular A Ship of Fools, The Karavan Ensemble’s latest production begins in the centre of town with Marion Déprez conducting an impromptu conference with the oversubscribed audience before herding them onto the Big Lemon and keeping up her trademark barmy authority throughout the circuitous journey. Getting there is half the fun really.

Anima is concerned with light: the significance of the way we light our lives and the influence of lighting choices on a performance. In the absence of a traditional lighting rig, the show is illuminated entirely by lamps donated, along with a few stories, by the people of Brighton.

Those accustomed to the Karavan Ensemble will recognise characters and vocabularies of movement, deployed to different ends but distinct and familiar. Ringmaster and director Yael Karavan herself, however, is conspicuous in her absence. Bruno Humberto again leads the pack, acting as our conduit to the abstractions on stage and framing disparate scenes as an astronomer and a conductor….

Anima is filled with wonderful moments. There are so many concepts, genuinely creative, which are effectively realised, as well as engaging, entertaining characters, witty visualisations and striking vignettes …This is undoubtedly another strikingly original production with perfectly conceived sound design.” 

By Sophie London

Total Theatre


On 23 May we were awarded the Argus Angel Award by Brighton newspaper The Argus.

“…to award artistic excellence during the Brighton Festival and Brighton Festival Fringe. From theatre and dance to music, live literature and exhibitions – The Argus Angels are presented to artists and performers who truly stand out from the crowd.” more info

We are delighted and excited to have received this golden token of recognition! (the statuette looks like a alien-like, angelic third cousin of the Oscar – it’s based on the Herald Angels of The Edinburgh Festival)

The response of the audience so far has been fantastic. Now in this following 2 wekeends, more stories about light will be unfolded. The journey starts on the Lemon Bus (don’t miss the bus departing from the Corn Exchange at 7h45pm) and continues  at the West Hill Community Centre. After the performance the bar and barn dance floor will be open for audience and cast enjoyment.

The demand for tickets has been high, so book your place in advance through:

Brighton Fringe Box Office online

Or through

Telephone ticket hotline 01273 917272

See you where the light begins

 

 

Photos by Andy Towers